Finding Your Rhythm Again | The BridgeMaker

Finding Your Rhythm Again

By on Apr 30, 2014

11 Comments


Finding Your Rhythm

Happiness is not a matter of intensity but of balance, order, rhythm and harmony. – Thomas Merton

Life has a way of flowing before ebbing again. The unexpected happens – disappointment strikes – and the once-solid ground begins to feel shaky.

Even though there’s no price for enjoying life’s gifts, reality has a way of reminding you that some days are just more difficult than others. Some days you get knocked off your stride, which leaves you winded but determined to find your rhythm again.

Losing Rhythm

Without much effort, my life moves at a reliable rhythm. When things are in tune, my relationships are on track, work is going well, and problems seem to melt away with little effort.

Then the blind-side hit happens.

The blow I didn’t see coming knocks me down and my world starts spinning. My rhythm loses it beat. I’m left aiming at a moving target with little hope of finding it.

Decisions become harder and nothing feels the same. While I often understand what hit me, I don’t always realize how the blow compromised my rhythm. It’s usually the subtle signs that tell me that my pace is off, things like:

- Sleeping restlessly
- Not keeping up with email
- Preferring to be alone
- Doubting myself
- Feeling uncreative
- Struggling to smile

If these signs seem familiar to you, then join me in finding the rhythm again by turning to…

  • Rest. If you’re tired, then finding your rhythm is almost impossible. Make time to clear your mind, rest your body and refresh your spirit. Listen to the signals your body is sending you and respond.
  • Do what you love. Maybe it’s cooking, writing or woodworking. Take in the comfort these things provide and allow them to jumpstart you.
  • Don’t give up. Finding the strength to keep your eyes above the waves isn’t always easy, but it is always a matter of faith. Hold on to the promise that there are lessons in every experience – even the crummy ones.
  • Read something you love. Get lost with your favorite author and let your mind drift. This type of mental escape can reduce anxiety. And when you return from the sojourn, you may be greeted with a new perspective.
  • Find Inspiration. Whatever your inspiration source is, tap into it and then let it fill you back up

Like the waves that rise from the ocean, sometimes there’s a surge before the water ebbs and retreats.

The next time you are standing knee deep in water remember this: The ebb and the flow always come back into balance. So, you will find your rhythm again to love, to share, to give, and simply to be.

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The BridgeMaker Founder Alex Blackwell is the author of Letting Go: 25 True Stories of Peace, Hope and Surrender. Join the community to connect, share and inspire: Email | Twitter | Facebook | More Posts

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  • nanette

    this is truly inspiring. it opens my eye that in every difficult journey there is still hope

    • http://www.thebridgemaker.com/ Alex Blackwell

      Nanette – hope is always there, we just have to open our eyes to see it. Best wishes on your journey!

  • Susan

    These words were just what I needed to hear. A beautifully written piece full of wisdom. Thank you.

    • http://www.thebridgemaker.com/ Alex Blackwell

      You are most welcome Susan!

  • http://www.bemoreunuversity.com Jimmy Burgess

    I loved this post. Retweeting it.

    • http://www.thebridgemaker.com/ Alex Blackwell

      Hi Jimmy – I’m happy you connected with the post and thanks for sharing!

  • http://imanidealist.com Wan Muhammad Zulfikri Bin Wan

    “The next time you are standing knee deep in water remember this: The ebb and the flow always come back into balance.”

    Wonderful words, Alex. I’m currently at a point where I find myself to be losing balance many times. It’s hard to regain that balance if you don’t have a plan of how you want to handle it.

    • http://www.thebridgemaker.com/ Alex Blackwell

      Wan – I’m happy the post brought you some comfort. Thanks for sharing!

      Alex

      • Lindsay

        Lovely post; thanks. To Wan I say “How have you handled situations like this in the past”? then take baby steps to repeat. I think we forget we have often been down this road before…thanks for the reminder Alex :-)

        • http://imanidealist.com Wan Muhammad Zulfikri Bin Wan

          “How have you handled situations like this in the past”? then take baby steps to repeat.”

          Thanks for the advice, Lindsay. Really appreciate it.

  • http://www.thebridgemaker.com Alex Blackwell

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